Robert E. Reiter, MD

Robert E. Reiter, MD

Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Los Angeles, California

Robert E. Reiter, MD, MBA, is the Bing Professor of Urology and Molecular Biology and Director of the Prostate Cancer Treatment and Research Program at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is currently the Principal Investigator of UCLA’s SPORE (Specialized Program in Research Excellence) program, a $12 million research grant from the National Cancer Institute to develop new diagnostic and treatment options for men with prostate cancer. Dr. Reiter’s clinical interests include robotic surgical management of prostate cancer and the use of both MRI and molecular imaging tools to manage this disease. His research is focused on the development of novel antibodies for both treatment and imaging of prostate cancer, as well as on the role of epithelial to mesenchymal transition in castration and treatment resistance. Dr. Reiter completed his undergraduate studies at Yale University and earned his medical degree at Stanford University Medical School.

Disclosures:

Articles by Robert E. Reiter, MD

PSMA PET Gallium Scan Approved by FDA

E. David Crawford, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Grand Rounds in Urology, interviews Robert E. Reiter, MD, Bing Professor of Urology and Molecular Biology, Director of the Prostate Cancer Program, and Director of Urologic Research at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, on yesterday’s FDA approval of PSMA PET gallium scans for use in prostate cancer patients at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Reiter, one of the investigators on the study that led to this, discusses how the approval, which was a joint effort between teams at UCLA and UCSF, is the first approval of a PSMA targeting agent in the United States, and will give new, potentially more effective options for urologists to stage prostate cancer for both newly-diagnosed and recurrent disease, leading to earlier detection of both metastatic disease and sites of recurrence, as well as improved overall management of the disease. They also discuss costs and potential insurance coverage at the currently-approved UCLA/UCSF sites and beyond, next steps for broader approval, and the implications of using PSMA PET in a theranostics approach to diagnosis and treatment of mCRPC and oligometastatic prostate cancer, as well as other disease states.

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Molecular Imaging For Staging and Advanced Disease – Axumin and PSMA

Robert E. Reiter, MD, Bing Professor of Urology and Molecular Biology, Director of the Prostate Cancer Program, and Director of Urologic Research at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, discusses the benefits of PSMA imaging in the context of biochemical recurrence. He reviews data from an Australian and an American study which both depict a positive correlation between PSA levels and PSMA prostate cancer detection rates, as well as high sensitivities for detection of recurrence based on pathologic confirmation. He then discusses the results of a study which compared PSMA with Axumin and found PSMA to be more than twice as effective in all areas but the prostate bed, which is most likely due to PSMA being excreted through the bladder. He argues that PSMA imaging can produce between a 29% and 76% change in prostate cancer management and allows for greater precision in treatment, resulting in fewer occurrences of unnecessary radiation therapy and long term systemic therapy.

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