Section Editor:


J. Curtis Nickel, MD, FRCSC

Associate Editor:


Timothy C. Hlavinka, MD

Supported by

NEXT GENERATION

GU Microbiome Learning Center

There is an abundance of evidence that the human microbiome plays an important and nuanced role in controlling human metabolism, immunity, and cancer. The recent discovery of the existence of a human genitourinary microbiome has led to the investigation of its role in mediating the pathogenesis of genitourinary malignancies, including bladder, kidney, and prostate cancers. Furthermore, although it is largely recognized that members of the gastrointestinal microbiota are actively involved in drug metabolism, new studies demonstrate additional roles and the potential necessity of the gastrointestinal microbiota in dictating cancer treatment response.

There is now a host of evidence for a unique genitourinary (GU) microbiome.Translating microbiome research into clinical action will require incorporation of microbiome surveillance into ongoing and future clinical trials as well as expansion of studies to include metagenomic sequencing and metabolomics.  In this learning center we aim to review the most current research looking at a link with the gut and genitourinary microbiome.

PLATINUM LECTURE

An Implementation of Next Generation Sequence (NGS) for Diagnosis and Targeted Treatment of UTI

Vladimir Mouraviev, MD, PhD, discusses the history and recent advances of testing for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and advocates for using the next generation sequencing option to identify biofilm-driven chronic infections in the modern era.

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