Nelson N. Stone, MD

Nelson N. Stone, MD

Mount Sinai School of Medicine

New York, New York

Nelson N. Stone, MD, is Professor of Urology, Radiation Oncology, and Oncological Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at the Derald H. Ruttenberg Cancer Center at Mount Sinai. He also serves as CEO of 3D Biopsy, LLC. Dr. Stone earned his medical degree from the University of Maryland in 1979. He completed a Residency in General Surgery in 1981 at the University of Maryland, followed by a Residency in Urology at the University of Maryland. He then completed a Fellowship in Urologic Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and a Research Fellowship in Biochemical Endocrinology at Rockefeller University in 1986. He was Chief of Urology at Elmhurst Hospital from 1989-1996. Dr. Stone has founded several medical companies and serves on the editorial board of many scientific journals. He is a member of many professional societies, including the Prostate Conditions Education Council, the Society for Minimally Invasive Therapy, the New York State Urological Society, the American Association of Clinical Urologists, and the American Urologic Association. Dr. Stone has participated in approximately 25 research studies on prostate cancer and has authored more than 400 articles, abstracts, and book chapters, primarily on prostate cancer. He invented the real-time technique for prostate seed implantation in 1990 and has trained more than 5,000 physicians worldwide on prostate brachytherapy through his company ProSeed. His company, 3DBiopsy, Inc., is developing variable length biopsy devices, mapping software, and an integrated pathology system.

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Articles by Nelson N. Stone, MD

Does the Radiation Dose Required to Eradicate Local Disease Differ by Gleason Grade Group?

Nelson N. Stone, MD, Professor of Urology, Radiation Oncology, and Oncological Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at the Derald H. Ruttenberg Cancer Center at Mount Sinai, discusses the radiation dose requirements for local disease eradication and the implications for focal therapy. He presents studies of external vema radiation and brachytherapy, which both showed that as the radiation dose increased the likelihood of a positive biopsy decreased two years post treatment. Dr. Stone concludes that it does not matter what type of disease the patient has, it matters how much radiation is used to get rid of the disease. Longer term follow up is needed to see the impact of radiation doses. Post-irradiation biopsies imply that a BED of over 240 Gy can eradicate all prostate cancer. If a tumor is small then there is a potential for a high dose of radiation just to the affected regions. Larger tumors or cases with extensive multifocality will require a full dose treatment with a full or partial implant.

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Can One Biopsy Event Determine Type and Amount of Focal Therapy Treatment?

Nelson N. Stone, MD, Professor of Urology, Radiation Oncology, and Oncological Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at the Derald H. Ruttenberg Cancer Center at Mount Sinai argues for the use of Transperineal Mapping Biopsy (TPMB), and against the use of strict criteria and cursory cancer identification methods for finding Focal Therapy eligible patients. He expresses a clinical need for a process that identifies Focal Therapy candidates and lists which portions of the prostate require treatment. He suggests that TPMB can fulfill these goals. Dr. Stone summarizes a review of the evidence for using focal therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer and found that despite at least 50% of patients being Focal Therapy eligible only a minority of patients actually receive the therapy. He critiques a study on Focal Therapy eligibility determined by MRI/US fusion biopsy on the basis of using too strict of criteria for selecting patients and in consideration of the possibility of missing many patients due to not using a biopsy. Dr. Stone discusses several other studies that depict MRI as unreliable in accurately identifying Focal Therapy patients compared to TPMP due to the lower accuracy of MRI across the prostate.

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Advanced PET Imaging for Prostate Cancer Staging

Nelson N. Stone, MD, discusses the importance of precisely locating sites of failure in recurrent prostate cancer patients. He focuses on how new positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging agents can improve detection, noting the need for improved detection methods in patients with low PSA levels.

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