Una Lee, MD, FPMRS

Una Lee, MD, FPMRS

Virginia Mason Medical Center

Seattle, Washington

Dr. Una Lee earned her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine in 2003. Following this, she completed her residency in Urology at the Cleveland Clinic and a fellowship in Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles. Currently, she works at Virginia Mason Medical Center in the Urology, Pelvic Floor Center, and Transgender Health departments.

Dr. Lee specializes in pelvic floor reconstruction, and is certified by the American Board of Urology in both Urology and Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery. Special interests include male and female urinary incontinence and voiding dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse (vaginal prolapse repair and robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery for prolapse repair), overactive bladder, fistula repair, urethral diverticulum, neurogenic bladder, urinary obstruction, and complications related to vaginal mesh or prior sling.

Dr. Lee is also known for her research in urogynecology. In 2012, she received the Pioneer Research Award from the Wilske Center for Translational Research. Additionally, she is a member of the American Urogynecology Society and the Society for Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine, and Urogenital Reconstruction.

Disclosures:

Faculty/Lecturer: Medtronics
Investigator: Axonics, Cook MyoSite

Articles by Una Lee, MD, FPMRS

Recurrent UTI in Women: AUA/SUFU Guidelines

Una Lee, MD, FPMRS, urologist and researcher at Virginia Mason Medical Center, reviews the 2019 AUA/SUFU guidelines on uncomplicated recurrent urinary tract infection (rUTI) in women, summarizes the evidence underlying these guidelines, and discusses their relevance to clinical scenarios. She first details complications clinicians may experience, such as antibiotic resistant infections and stressed patients. Dr. Lee then discusses the guideline recommendations: clinicians should use first-line therapy; should obtain urinalysis, urine culture, and sensitivity; may offer patient-initiated treatment; should use as short a duration of antibiotics as possible; may offer cranberry prophylaxis for women with rUTIs; should obtain a full patient history; and should not treat asymptomatic bacteriuria. She then argues that although molecular diagnostics are available, the sensitive microorganism detection they provide is associated with overtreatment, overdiagnosis, and confusion due to our current lack of data on which microorganisms are necessary or harmful for a healthy urinary microbiome. Dr. Lee concludes by discussing cranberries and the treatment capabilities of the proanthocyanidins (PACs) they contain, noting that antibiotics are still considered to be more effective, however.

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Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery in Women: Defining Success and Patient Satisfaction

Una Lee, MD, FPMRS, urologist and researcher at Virginia Mason Medical Center, reviews the evidence on non-mesh alternatives for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). She provides an overview of the causes of female SUI, presents an effective treatment tree addressing both overactive bladder and stress incontinence, and discusses treatment options. Dr. Lee encourages physicians to consider how they present treatment decisions in order to allow patients to make the choice that fits best for them. In addition to covering all possible risks and benefits, she advises physicians to also educate patients on their condition and help manage their expectations for treatment outcomes.

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Stress Urinary Incontinence: Non-Mesh Alternatives

Una Lee, MD, FPMRS, urologist and researcher at Virginia Mason Medical Center, reviews the evidence on non-mesh alternatives for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). She provides an overview of the causes of female SUI, presents an effective treatment tree addressing both overactive bladder and stress incontinence, and discusses treatment options. Dr. Lee encourages physicians to consider how they present treatment decisions in order to allow patients to make the choice that fits best for them. In addition to covering all possible risks and benefits, she advises physicians to also educate patients on their condition and help manage their expectations for treatment outcomes.

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Geriatric Considerations in Urinary Incontinence and Overactive Bladder (OAB)

Una Lee, MD, FPMRS, a urologist at the Virginia Mason Medical Center, discusses concepts physicians should consider when managing urinary incontinence and overactive bladder (OAB) in geriatric populations. First, Dr. Lee reviews the “5 M’s”: mind, mobility, medications, multi-complexity, and what matters most to the patient, or care goals/preferences. Additionally, she addresses the role of frailty in older adults, which is associated with increased risk of poor health outcomes. Lastly, she reviews data about the association of anticholinergic medication use and dementia.

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