Wolfgang Weber, MD

Wolfgang Weber, MD

Technical University of Munich

Munich, Bavaria, Germany

Wolfgang Weber, MD, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Technical University of Munich in Germany (TUM). Dr. Weber graduated from and trained at TUM. He has been an Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology at the University of California, Los Angeles; Professor and Chair of the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the University of Freiburg in Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany; Chief of Nuclear Medicine at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City; and Professor of Radiology at Weill-Cornell Medical College, also in New York City. He focuses on molecular imaging of cancer for therapeutic interventions, and is interested in targeted radionuclide therapy and theranostics. Dr. Weber has published 250+ papers in numerous journals, including the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, the Journal of Clinical Oncology, and others. He has also served on the editorial boards of several medical journals.

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Articles by Wolfgang Weber, MD

Current State-of-the-Art Molecular and Multi-Modality Imaging and Theranostics of Prostate Cancer

Wolfgang Weber, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Technical University of Munich in Germany (TUM), reviews a half-decade of progress in the field of prostate cancer imaging and theranostics. First, he introduces glutamate carboxypeptidase, which is highly expressed in primary and metastatic prostate cancer. Dr. Weber then compares different PSMA ligands for PET imaging, finding that GA-PSMA-11 has extensive clinical experience but has small batch sizes; GA-THP-PSMA is very easy to label and has a lower uptake by normal organs but also has small batch sizes, renal excretion, and lower tumor uptake; F-DCFPyL has large batch production but renal excretion; F-PSMA-1007 has large batches and low renal excretion but suffers from a higher frequency of non-specific uptake; and F-rhPSMA-7.3 has large batches and low renal excretion but higher frequency of non-specific uptake. He displays a graph comparing the focal uptake in benign lesions between GA-PSMA-11 and F-PSMA-1007, revealing that GA-PSMA-11 is only displayed in 52 lesions vs. F-PSMA-1007’s 542. Dr. Weber then reviews a study of a specific patient who experienced normalization after 4 treatment cycles to depict the possible effectiveness of ligands. However, he observes that such success is not true for all patients, citing a study of the clinical experience in 100 consecutive mCRPC patients treated with Lu-177 PSMA I and T, finding a median of 12.9 months of survival for patients. Another similar study found a median of 13.5 months of survival for patients. Dr. Weber concludes by looking at a comparison of Lu-PSMA-617 and cabazitaxel which suggests that Lu-PSMA-617 is more effective and could be used to treat earlier stages of prostate cancer.

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Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

Wolfgang Weber, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Technical University of Munich in Germany, discusses the changes in molecular imaging over the last 7 years and their impact on staging and re-staging of prostate cancer. Dr. Weber discusses how PSMA PET imaging works by binding with the ligands of antigens present in cells affected by prostate cancer. He also describes studies in which molecular imaging has been useful in reclassifying nmCRPC by identifying metastases not visible using conventional imaging, specifically in bones and lymph nodes. This has led to novel theranostic approaches where imaging closely intertwines with surgery or chemotherapy to potentially improve treatment outcomes.

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